The Early Church and Military Service | Jesus Creed

...Tertullian, for instance, wrote an entire treatise forbidding military service among Christians (The Crown) and such sentiment is found throughout his other writings (On Idolatry). Origen too condemned military service whenever he addressed the subject. And Lactantius agreed: “A just man may not be a soldier” (Divine Institutes, 6.20). Now again, there were Christians in …

Continue reading The Early Church and Military Service | Jesus Creed

Lamb’s Harbinger on Clement I

Clement (I) of Rome is regarded by scholars of early Christianity as one of the earliest post-Apostolic Christian leaders, being supposed to have received appointment as an elder/overseer of the church at Rome by the Apostle Peter. Clement's only letter (1 Clement), composed (logically speaking) sometime during his service to the Church of God at …

Continue reading Lamb’s Harbinger on Clement I

Evangelical Romanticism

Key conclusion: the patristics have never been the property of the Roman Catholics or even the Eastern Orthodox. The idea that leaving evangelicalism to find the apostolic fathers or patristics is Romanticism, not history. But what we need is a generation of evangelicals educated as leaders by learning the patristics. The collapse of Trinitarian thinking in …

Continue reading Evangelical Romanticism

Ignatius of Antioch: a Bloody Diotrephes

Ignatius of Antioch wrote c. 98-117 A.D., and only the collection of his writings, called the Middle Recension, is considered authentic. All others are forgeries. Still, one must remember that the topic of Ignatius’ letters’ authenticity is still much debated! The Texts: https://www.loebclassics.com/view/ignatius-letters_ephesians/2003/pb_LCL024.215.xml SUMMARY: In his writings, Ignatius openly concedes that his teachings should not …

Continue reading Ignatius of Antioch: a Bloody Diotrephes

The Historical Ills of Dominion Theology, Kingdom Now Theology and Covenant Replacement Theology

There are some forms of Christianity that hold to the belief (i.e. “covenant replacement theology”) that Christians are to establish God’s kingdom on earth through societal, legal and political means... and historically, these kinds of Christians have started wars, crusades and even City/States (ex. Vatican, Geneva, Amsterdam) in order to spread or “bring in” God’s …

Continue reading The Historical Ills of Dominion Theology, Kingdom Now Theology and Covenant Replacement Theology